Engaging Faith 2018

23rd Annual
2018 International Conference
Dates: November 14-16, 2018

Registration Before October 14, 2018
Member Early Bird: $350 | Non-Member Early Bird: $400

Registration After October 14, 2018
Member $400 | Non-Member $450

Breakfast and lunch included in the registration cost

This course is approved by the Michigan Social Work
Continuing Education Collaborative

Course Approval: #083018-01
Up to 20 Michigan Social Work CE Hours
Up to 20 BIPSCC CEU's

A Groundbreaking International Conference to explore and examine the impact of religion/faith/spirituality on battering intervention practice and programs!

The Battering Intervention Services Coalition of Michigan (BISC-MI) 2018 Annual Conference is entitled, Religion, Faith, Spirituality, Science & Research: Engaging for Safety and Accountability.  Participants will have the opportunity to expand knowledge, perceptions, and experiences. This conference will explore the impact of connecting the field of battering intervention with the often contradictory and complicated issues of religion, faith, spirituality, incorporating principles of science and research.

Engaging faith communities, and developing strategies to address the personal religious/faith/spiritual beliefs, can provide important, meaningful pathways for intervention and change for many who participate in battering intervention programs. Examining the multiple and overlapping contexts regarding the historical impact of a wide range of religious institutions, faith beliefs and spiritual practices is critical to this process. Applying recent research and advances in science to inform practice is an essential component.

Join BISC-MI as we continue the tradition of providing exciting, relevant, and innovative conferences to advance the field of battering intervention!


The Office on Violence Against Women has once again approved our request to invite OVW grantees to attend The Battering Intervention Services Coalition of Michigan (BISC-MI) 2018 International Conference to be held November 14-16, 2018.

Grantees from ICJR, Justice for Families, Rural and State Coalition programs have conditionally approved their grantees to attend this conference. Grantees are required to contact their OVW program specialist to get approval specific to their award and to ensure that a Grant Adjustment Notice (GAN) is issued. A GAN must be completed before grantees commit or expend any funds related to attending this conference.

Grantees from STOP may be invited to attend this conference and do not have to contact their program manager for prior approval. STOP sub-grantees need approval from their STOP State Administrator. Grantees who are not required to get prior approval to attend this conference should be advised to place a “memo to the file” in their grant records indicating the conference approval reference number.

The reference number for this conference is OVW-2019-MU-003. This number must be used by grantees when requesting approval via a GAN or in their “memo to the file”. This approval and assigned reference number is for this conference only.



Make lodging reservations early!
Offering generously low rates at RADISSON HOTEL LANSING AT THE CAPITOL

LODGING RATES & RESERVATIONS:

PARKING RATES: With discounted parking!
Don’t wait! The lodging deadline for making reservations at the significantly discounted group rate is Sunday, October 14 or when the block is full! 

LocationRADISSON HOTEL LANSING AT THE CAPITOL
Location Address: 111 N. Grand Avenue, Lansing MI 48933

Hotel Rates: $75.00 Individual/Double plus applicable taxes.
If you are state of Michigan tax exempt, be sure present appropriate documentation at hotel check in)
Be sure to use the promotional code to receive the discount: BISC18

To make reservations online, use this link: www.radisson.com/lansingmi 
To make reservations by phone, call: 
1.800.333.3333

The Radisson Hotel Lansing at the Capitol offers all overnight guests valet parking for a nominal fee of $20.00, per vehicle. However, The Radisson Hotel is pleased to reduce valet parking to $12.00 per night, per vehicle for the conference overnight guests.

Temporary self-parking is available on a space available, first come, first served basis in the city-owned ramp conveniently connected to the Radisson Hotel Lansing at the Capitol via a climate controlled pedway. Current parking rates are, the 1st half hour free, $1.00 for each additional 1/2 hour, maximum of $10.00 per day.

Attendees are responsible for making their own lodging reservations and expenses for the 2018 BISC-MI Annual Conference.

 


The Ed Gondolf COMPASS Award

Recognizing and honoring those who have significantly guided and expanded efforts to protect survivors through advancing and evaluating accountable perpetrator intervention research and programming.

The COMPASS Award will be awarded to: The Rev. Dr. Marie M. Fortune during this conference!

Founder and Senior Analyst FaithTrust Institute
Rev. Dr. Fortune, a minister in the United Church of Christ, founded FaithTrust Institute in 1977. A graduate of Yale Divinity School, she is a pastor, educator, and author as well as a practicing ethicist and theologian. Her books include Keeping the Faith: Guidance for Christian Women Facing Abuse and Sexual Violence: The Sin Revisited.


CONFERENCE AGENDA

Day One: Wednesday, November 14, 2018

8:15 pm - 9:30 pm Registration Check In

8:15 am - 9:30 am Continental Breakfast – Provided

9:30 am - 9:45 am
PLENARY SESSION Welcome

9:45 am - 10:45 am
PLENARY SESSION Riane Eisler: Transforming Masculinity, Femininity, Spirituality, and Society: From Domination to Partnership
This workshop places the work to stop traditions of domestic violence in its larger social and historical context. Challenging conventional thinking, it shows that violence and abuse in families is built into cultures (whether Eastern or Western, secular or religious) that orient to the configuration of domination systems. It further shows how re-examining and re-defining stereotypes of masculinity and femininity is key to not only ending domestic violence but also to building foundations for a more equitable, caring, truly spiritual society. Drawing on Dr. Eisler's decades of research, it validates the vital work of changing patterns of domination and violence in families, where people first learn what is considered moral and right in all human relations.

10:45 am - 11:00 am Break

11:00 am - 12:00 pm
PLENARY SESSION Bob Geffner: Neurobiology of Trauma, Adverse Childhood Experiences, and Implications Concerning IPV Offenders
This plenary addresses the current science concerning adverse childhood experiences (ACEs), the neurobiology of trauma, and traumatic brain injuries (TBIs), and how these may have implications for intimate partner violence/abuse (IPV) offending. The implications for using a biopsychosocial approach to dealing with IPV has often been overlooked by advocates, mental health professionals and other treatment providers. This plenary presents current research and approaches that suggest these issues need to be taken into account when working with IPV offenders, including the importance of differential assessment.

12:00 pm - 1:00 pm Lunch - Provided

1:00 pm - 2:00 pm
PLENARY SESSION Dr. Anne Ganley and Dr. Oliver Williams: Battering Intervention Programs and Faith Traditions
In the late 1960’s and early ‘70’s the battered women’s movement was beginning to gather traction to contribute to the wellbeing of victims and save women’s lives through shelter programs and other support services. In the mid to late ‘70’s, mothers of the movement asked men with good intentions to talk to men that were being violent and abusive toward their female partners. Many of the early women leaders of BIPs came out of the shelter movement as well as the violence against women movement and the civil rights movement. Shelter programs helped to support this early work and men began to meet and discuss non-violence and alternatives to abuse. During this era, both victims and perpetrators of abuse reached out to faith communities. Just as society struggled with domestic violence so did faith communities. Although working with faith has been a part of that DV history, bad advice, misinterpretation of scripture, cultural influences and sexism have been barriers in faith houses for victims and perpetrators pursing help from abuse. This presentation will offer insight into what some of the challenges have been but also offer hope about the future and how some faith houses and BIP programs are including faith in their work with battered women and men who batter.

2:00 pm - 3:30 pm
PLENARY SESSION Plenary Panel: BIPs that are faith based
This panel will provide an inside look at programs that address battering intervention from a faith perspective.
Panelists: Ty Schroyer, Chris Moles, JR Thicklin, and Oliver Williams

3:30 pm - 3:45 pm Break

3:45 pm - 5:15 pm
Break-Out Workshops
Workshop: 1A Salma Elkadi Abugideiri: Towards Developing a Muslim BIP
Behavior change can often occur when people are motivated to live in a manner that is congruent with their values. This session will consider core Islamic teachings around justice, compassionate accountability and the elements that are necessary for repentance as ingredients for facilitating attitudinal and behavioral changes. The role model of Prophet Muhammad will be presented as a means to re-defining stereotypes of masculinity and as a model for equitable relationships grounded in compassion, love and tranquility.

Workshop: 1B Bob Geffner: The Neurobiology of Trauma and the Brain: A Biopsychosocial Approach to Treating IPV Offenders
We have learned over the past 20 years that psychological trauma, adverse childhood experiences (ACEs), and traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) can affect behaviors and personality. We have also learned that neurobiological factors can play a role in the behaviors and attitudes of both offenders and victims of intimate partner abuse/violence (IPV) that may help explain some of the issues that domestic violence treatment providers and advocates face. This workshop will focus on how the interface among neuropsychology, trauma, and IPV has implications for intervention approaches. Practical suggestions are presented for screening and working with such clients, overcoming intervention barriers, and using solution-focused and trauma-focused techniques to enhance changes in attitudes, beliefs, and behaviors for IPV offenders from a brain-behavior perspective.

Workshop: 1C Michael Paymar: The Duluth Model Coordinated Community Response
The Duluth Model was created as a coordinated community response (CCR) comprised of law enforcement, agencies in the criminal and civil justice systems and some human service providers. The Duluth Domestic Abuse Intervention Project (DAIP) crafted an organizing methodology to ensure that intervening agencies in the CCR were held accountable to each other through policies, procedures and practices. The goals were and are to make communities safer for survivors of IPV and hold offenders accountable for their violence. The Duluth Model was and continues to be a criminal and civil justice reform initiative.

Workshop: 1D Fr. Charles Dahm: How the church can and should respond to domestic violence
This session focuses on the experience of developing the Archdiocese of Chicago Domestic Violence Outreach. This effort involves reaching out to parishes, preaching at all weekend services, and then forming a local parish ministry. From this grassroots work, an archdiocesan organization, consistently almost entirely of volunteers, is developed that focuses on building awareness, connecting to services and promoting prevention.

Workshop: 1E Andy J. Johnson: Intersections of Religion, Culture, and Social Location in Intimate Partner Violence
Intimate partner violence (IPV) is a complex, multifaceted phenomenon that occurs in every known national, socioeconomic, religious, cultural, and ethnic group. Dynamics of IPV may differ according to the intersection of the social locations of a particular client, however, making one size fits all approaches to the understanding and treatment of IPV less effective and potentially even harmful in some cases. This session focuses on intimate partner violence as it affects persons at the intersection of diverse social locations, including religion, culture, ethnicity, national origin, immigration status, and sexual orientation.  Unique beliefs, practices, and situations facing diverse persons affected by IPV that need to be considered to increase treatment effectiveness will be examined.

Dinner on your own

Day Two: Thursday, November 15, 2018

7:45 am - 8:15 am Registration

7:45 am - 8:15 am Continental Breakfast – Provided

8:15 am - 8:30 am
PLENARY SESSION Welcome and Housekeeping

8:30 am - 9:30 am
PLENARY SESSION Panel: Interfaith Panel on understanding the perpetrator of domestic violence: This facilitated panel will discuss different faith perspectives geared toward increasing understanding and engagement of men who've been abusive to their partners.
Rabbi Mark Dratch, Rabbi Marla R. Hornsten, Salma Elkadi Abugideiri, Chris Moles, Fr. Charles Dahm, Bishop Mitchell, J.R. Thicklin Moderator: Marie Fortune

9:30 am - 10:30 am
PLENARY SESSION Rabbi Marla R. Hornsten: Jewish Women International Clergy Task Force: Resources and Advocacy
Faith leaders can provide tremendous support and guidance for families experiencing domestic violence, as well as respected voices advocating for healthy relationships. In this interactive workshop, participants will learn strategies to engage faith and lay leaders, participate in a sample exercise, and receive resources developed by the Clergy Task Force on Domestic Abuse in the Jewish Community and Jewish Women International for use in their communities.

10:30 am - 10:45 am Break

10:45 am - 12:15 pm
PLENARY SESSION Julie Owens A Christian Survivor Looks Back: Reflecting on a Life Impacted and Informed by Domestic Violence
In 1988, Julie was the separated mother of an eight-month-old baby when she and her pastor father were ambushed and violently attacked by her estranged husband. Soon her life focus shifted to supporting victims, working for justice, affecting systems change, promoting best practices in victim advocacy, and educating secular and religious professionals about violence against women. For many years Julie was stalked from prison while raising her child, working full time, and helping craft laws based on her many unexpected experiences in the civil and criminal court systems. In 2013, she learned that her abuser was terminally ill in a prison hospice. Despite the reservations of her loved ones, Julie felt compelled to drive her 25-year-old son to Texas to meet his father before he died. The result was another unexpected experience, one that taught her the profound power of restorative justice. Julie will share how her life has been impacted, shaped and informed by living through and beyond domestic violence, and the many lessons she learned as a result.

12:15 pm - 1:15 pm Lunch – Provided

1:15 pm - 2:15 pm
PLENARY SESSION Nancy Nason-Clark, Ph.D.: Holy Hush or Shattered Silence: Can Religion Be Part of the Solution to Domestic Violence and Not Just Part of the Problem?
Based on their program of research, which spans over 25 years, this session will examine what happens in families of deep faith when violence strikes at home. They will discuss many of the specific studies their team has conducted involving religious leaders, congregations, battered women, men in batterer intervention programs, and the army of workers who assist families impacted by abuse—including criminal justice workers, therapeutic staff, advocacy workers, and religious leaders. The session will identify and examine ways in which religion and religious leaders both augment and thwart the journey towards justice, accountability, healing and wholeness for women and men caught in the web of intimate partner violence, either as victims or perpetrators.

2:15 pm - 2:30 pm Break

2:30 pm – 4:00 pm Break-Out Workshops
Workshop: 2A Dr. Riane Eisler and Julie Owens: Exposing the Religious Roots of Violence and Finding the Pathway to Partnership in These Trying Times. 
This unprecedented time of #MeToo and #ChurchToo provides a unique window of opportunity to expose the roots of violence and confront traditions that justify and normalize the subjugation of women and children. Our task is formidable, given the current political culture and the predominantly male religious base supporting a president with a long history of misogyny. Understanding the historical origins of male domination, including the underlying religious assumptions and doctrines, is imperative. Effective violence prevention and intervention requires confronting specific harmful religious ideologies, including the belief that God’s design for humankind places males in a position superior to females in all spheres of life. The necessary global paradigm shift away from domination and toward partnership can only occur when this presumption is reframed as the immoral result of errant interpretations of scripture. Traditional child-raising practices in cultures with gender inequality must be understood as the basis of male violence and oppression. As changemakers, we need to be equipped to effectively educate not only our clients but also our peers and our political and religious leaders, about the deeply rooted cultural and sacred traditions that underpin men’s violence.

Workshop: 2B Rabbi Mark Dratch, Rabbi Marla R. Hornsten: All Are Responsible for All: A Jewish Perspective
This session will address the obligation to hold perpetrators accountable and responsible for their abuse, explore the religious roadblocks that undermine that accountability, and explore the personal and communal roles in supporting perpetrators as well.

Workshop: 2C J.R. Thicklin and Chris Moles: A look at how the Christianity can inform and transform men who are abusive.
Two perspectives on identifying and using the Bible to understand and intervene with men who are abusive.

Workshop: 2D Salma Elkadi Abugideiri: What Does Islam Say About Domestic Violence?
This session will provide an overview of Islamic teachings regarding gender, relationships, and marriage. The intersection of culture, religion and domestic violence will also be addressed. Attention will also be given to the role of individuals and community leaders in preventing and responding to domestic violence.

Workshop: 2E Carmelita Samuel: The Science of Movement and Breath; Mindfulness Interventions that Rewire the Brain
This experiential workshop will take you on the journey of understanding how advances in neurobiology and neuroscience of trauma and research in body-oriented therapies, like yoga and mindfulness techniques, can effectively help treat many emotional and psychological conditions and their symptoms. Participants will explore first-hand the experiences t and benefits of breathing and moving. This workshop combines the traditional approach of psychoeducation with the holistic pathway of yoga and mindfulness interventions to help eliminate these negative emotions, promote self-regulation, and increase inner peace by rewiring the brain. Participants will experience an evidence-based approach for treatment and self-care techniques that can be used for those who batter. Please, come prepared to explore and learn with your physical participation.

4:00 pm - 4:15 pm Break

4:15 pm - 5:45 pm Break-Out Workshops
Workshop: 3A Julie Owens: Domestic Violence and the Church: Beyond "Pray,Stay, Obey"
DV is rarely effectively addressed by clergy, while religious clients are often misunderstood by those who intervene, leaving an enormous population of victims and abusers unserved or underserved. In churches, DV is frequently ignored, minimized, or justified, and treated as marital conflict. Trapped in dangerous marriages, and forbidden to divorce, victims are torn between their faith and their need for safety. Abusers are not held accountable. This workshop will explore common beliefs of Christian victims, church-going abusers, faith leaders and victim advocates. Specific key scriptures that are frequently misinterpreted, mistranslated or misused will be discussed. These include verses pertaining to God’s intended roles for males and females, a wife’s duty to submit, a husbands’ headship, divorce, suffering, forgiveness and repentance. Suggestions will be offered for engaging in meaningful dialog with religious victim/survivors and abusers. Information about an array of resources will be shared, including free webinars, on-line trainings, on-line victim support groups, doctrinal DV statements, clergy resources and more.

Workshop: 3B Ron Clark and Bishop Mitchell: Submit Or Else: Safe and Sacred Spaces?
In our work with faith based intervention providers one concern is that the Christian faith, Biblical interpretation, and clergy seem to continue to place victims and survivors at risk by teaching “forced submission" and to work in ways which do not promote accountability for the abuser. However, Christian communities can provide strong support for intervention providers as communities of accountability, safety for victims, and collaboration to offer healing and accountable repentance for offenders. In this class we will offer a discussion concerning models of safety, holiness, and accountability for congregations, leaders, abusers and those working with faith based clients in collaborating a healing presence in our communities.

Workshop: 3C Salma Elkadi Abugideiri: What Does Islam Say About Domestic Violence?
This session will provide an overview of Islamic teachings regarding gender, relationships, and marriage. The intersection of culture, religion and domestic violence will also be addressed. Attention will also be given to the role of individuals and community leaders in preventing and responding to domestic violence.

Workshop: 3D Carmelita Samuel: The Science of Movement and Breath: Mindfulness Interventions that Rewire the Brain
This experiential workshop will take you on the journey of understanding how advances in neurobiology and neuroscience of trauma and research in body-oriented therapies, like yoga and mindfulness techniques, can effectively help treat many emotional and psychological conditions and their symptoms. Participants will explore first-hand the experiences t and benefits of breathing and moving. This workshop combines the traditional approach of psychoeducation with the holistic pathway of yoga and mindfulness interventions to help eliminate these negative emotions, promote self-regulation, and increase inner peace by rewiring the brain. Participants will experience an evidence-based approach for treatment and self-care techniques that can be used for those who batter. Please, come prepared to explore and learn with your physical participation.

Workshop: 3E Andy J. Johnson: Intersections of Religion, Culture, and Social Location in Intimate Partner Violence
Intimate partner violence (IPV) is a complex, multifaceted phenomenon that occurs in every known national, socioeconomic, religious, cultural, and ethnic group. Dynamics of IPV may differ according to the intersection of the social locations of a particular client, however, making one size fits all approaches to the understanding and treatment of IPV less effective and potentially even harmful in some cases. This session focuses on intimate partner violence as it affects persons at the intersection of diverse social locations, including religion, culture, ethnicity, national origin, immigration status, and sexual orientation.  Unique beliefs, practices, and situations facing diverse persons affected by IPV that need to be considered to increase treatment effectiveness will be examined.

5:45 pm Dinner On Your Own

7:00 pm - 9:00 pm
PLENARY SESSION “Broken Vows: Religious Perspectives on Domestic Violence” documentary screening and discussion - Rev. Dr. Marie Fortune & Julie Owens
After Julie and her pastor father were assaulted by her estranged husband in 1988, she was given a copy of Rev. Fortune’s Keeping the Faith: Guidance for Christian Women Facing Abuse. Inspired, Julie invited Marie to train their church’s leadership. The training event featured Julie and other Christian survivors who shared their poignant stories. Subsequently, Marie decided to make an educational film featuring survivors and faith leaders. “Broken Vows: Religious Perspectives on Domestic Violence” was released in 1994. Through the accounts of survivors and the wisdom of a diverse group of clergy and DV experts, it addresses the ways religion has been misused to perpetuate abuse, and how faith communities can work to end DV. Almost twenty-five years later, “Broken Vows” remains the most widely used teaching tool on the subject. Marie and Julie will share the film, offer personal insights and answer questions.

Day Three: Friday, November 16, 2018

7:45 am – 8:15 am Registration

7:45 am - 8:30 am Continental Breakfast – Provided

8:15 am - 8:30 am Welcome and Housekeeping

8:30 am - 10:00 am
PLENARY SESSION Marie Fortune: Faith Matters: Calling Abusers to Account Description
The teachings of a faith tradition remain significant for a majority of women and men in our society. Even though some teachings have been distorted and misused, they are nonetheless operative when intimate partner violence occurs. Too often teachings about gender roles can be at least a distraction but usually a significant roadblock to ending the violence. The question is are there any resources with our faith traditions that can provide a framework for calling abusers to account? The answer is "yes" if we offer those resources in the context of community accountability. It is imperative that anyone working with abusive persons (and victim/survivors) realize when faith issues are in play and be prepared to address them or refer appropriately.

10:00 am - 10:30 am Award recognition: Marie Fortune

10:30 am – 10:45 am Break

10:45 am – 12:15 pm Break-Out Workshops

Workshop: 4A Bishop Mitchel & J.R. Thicklin: "The Culture of Silence in the African American Community About Domestic Violence"
This session will address the necessity of Faith and Spirituality to dispel myths, erroneous teachings and cultural norms and codes of silence. This session will dive into the understanding the nature of God and address how the Word of God is the prescription for violence and breaking through intergenerational curses. We will frame the scriptures that supports God's love and his command to us to love one another. This session will also address the disproportionate cases of domestic violence in the African American Community and confront self-hatred and cultural norms.

Workshop: 4B Anne Ganley, Ph.D.: BIP Practice Issues: Religion, Spirituality, Faith
Battering Intervention Programs work with participants from diverse faith traditions, in diverse settings (health, child welfare, social service, family law, and criminal justice systems) and with a variety of approaches. Some who abuse and batter use survivors’ faith traditions as a tactic of abuse against them and their children. Others who abuse and batter use religion as a way to justify or deflect responsibility for their own abusive conduct. This interactive workshop will review battering intervention program strategies (1) for identifying/assessing those who batter and abuse faith issues salient to their domestic violence conduct and (2) for integrating faith issues into battering intervention programs as a resource for behavioral change.

Workshop: 4C Salma Elkadi Abugideiri: Outreach and Collaboration with Muslim Communities
Partnerships, alliances and collaboration are key to addressing domestic violence in a coordinated and culturally appropriate manner. Many advocates and service providers are unsure how to connect with Muslim communities. This session will provide some suggestions and best practices, as well as time for participants to share their challenges and successes in working collaboratively with Muslim communities.

Workshop: 4D Ty Schroyer & Barb Jones: Changing Men, Changing Lives
Changing Men, Changing Lives (CMCL) is a culturally specific program for Christian men who batter. This workshop will cover the development of CMCL including its being informed by focus groups of Christian women, the CMCL supplement to Duluth's Creating a Process of Change for Men Who Batter curriculum, CMCL's place in a coordinated community response to address safety, accountability and social change and a brief demonstration of a CMCL class.

Workshop: 4E Rabbi Mark Dratch and Rabbi Marla R. Hornsten: All Are Responsible for All; A Jewish Perspective
This session will address the obligation to hold perpetrators accountable and responsible for their abuse, explore the religious roadblocks that undermine that accountability, and explore the personal and communal roles in supporting perpetrators as well.

12:15 pm - 1:15 pm Lunch – Provided

1:15 pm - 2:15 pm
PLENARY SESSION Michael Paymar & Oliver Williams: The work continues: Looking for New Opportunities to Address Gender Based Violence with Faith Communities – Part I
The documentary With Impunity: Men and Gender Violence, written by Michael Paymar and the late Ellen Pence explores gender-based violence by looking at the nature of the problem, the historical roots of men’s violence against women, the foundational pillars that allows oppression to occur, the influence of our culture on men and boys, the backlash against the gains women have made, and some paths toward change.

Ending gender-based violence won’t occur if we simply leave it up to law enforcement and the criminal justice system. And with all our good intentions, those of us who work with BIPs, advocates who work with survivors and other interveners; we know that we can’t resolve these complex issues alone.
It is our hope, that after viewing the film and engaging in meaningful dialogue we will be encouraged to challenge community institutions, (including the faith community) to promote an environment where men reject sexist beliefs in male superiority and entitlement and instead embrace equality, respect and nonviolent and non-controlling relationships with women.

By the end of the session, participants will learn from each other about social change strategies and successful ways to engage community institutions. When we return to our respective communities, hopefully we will be inspired to collaborate with others (we can’t do this alone) and challenge community organizations to do more.

Among the questions we will explore include: 1) what have we learned from our past that helps us expand our methods of addressing barriers to reducing domestic violence, 2) what are the benefits of including Faith in our work and 3) what are the challenges of including Faith in our work to address domestic violence, 4) do we include primary, secondary and tertiary approaches in addressing domestic violence among faith communities with men?

2:15 pm - 2:30 pm Break

2:30 pm - 3:30 pm
PLENARY SESSION Michael Paymar & Oliver Williams: The work continues: Looking for New Opportunities to Address Gender Based Violence with Faith Communities – Part II

3:30 pm Wrap-up and Raffle

4:00 pm Conference Ends

Disclaimer: Any opinion, findings, recommendations or conclusions, expressed by any author(s) or speaker(s) do not necessarily reflect the views of BISC-MI. BISC-MI reserves the right to substitute a qualified instructor or topic due to unforeseen circumstances.


 


Conference Sponsoring Organizations

 


Click to Meet The Faculty 


 

BISC-MI

We will provide a working forum for interaction and
information sharing among agencies and individuals
concerned with the provision of battering intervention in Michigan.