IOWA DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTIONS
STANDARDS FOR BATTERERS EDUCATION PROGRAMS




REV: 1/25/95

TABLE OF CONTENTS

ii MISSION STATEMENT
(Community Based Batterers Education Program)

iii MISSION STATEMENT (Institutional Batterers Education Groups)

iv PREFACE

v 1.0 DECLARATION OF PRINCIPLES 1 2.0

PURPOSE FOR Batterers EDUCATION PROGRAM STANDARDS 2 3.0

DEFINITION OF DOMESTIC ABUSE 3 4.0

COMMUNITY RESPONSE MODEL 3 5.0

PROGRAM APPROACHES 3 6.0

PROGRAM STANDARDS 4 6.1

General Ethical Standards 4 6.3

Confidentiality Issues/Batterers Files 5 6.4

Program Structure/Policies 6 6.16

Program Components 9 6.20

Fee Structure 10 7.0

STAFF SELECTION AND TRAINING REQUIREMENTS 11 8.0

MAINTENANCE OF DATA BASE 11

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS 12

APPENDIX A REV: 5/4/94


IOWA DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTIONS BATTERERS EDUCATION PROGRAM MISSION STATEMENT
(Community Based Batterers Education Program)

To reduce further victimization by: Providing a group education process for men and separate programming for women who practice a pattern of abusive behavior which includes physical, sexual and/or emotional abuse toward their partners. Providing information, referrals and support systems to the victims. Working in close cooperation with individuals, groups and agencies that concern themselves with issues surrounding domestic violence, such as criminal justice system, victim advocate, medical, family and children service, etc. Providing educational opportunities to the community concerning the nature, frequency and severity of domestic violence. REV: 5/4/94


IOWA DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTIONS BATTERERS EDUCATION PROGRAM MISSION STATEMENT
(Institutional Batterers Education Groups)

To reduce further victimization by: Identifying inmates with histories of abusive behavior which includes physical, sexual and/or emotional abuse toward partners. Providing a group education process for identified inmates advocating non-abusive behavior toward partners. Recommending follow up community programs as a part of institutional release plans. REV: 5/4/94


PREFACE

Domestic violence is a widespread problem with lethal consequences to victims and the communities in which they live. Domestic violence is a pattern of physical, sexual, and psychological assaults which batterers direct at adult intimates. Sometimes the same abusive pattern is present in adolescent dating relationships. The violence may result in death or permanent physical injury or may cause profound psychological damage to the victims. Not only are the primary victims affected, but so are the children who witness this abuse or who themselves are abused as part of the pattern. Furthermore, the violence ripples outward into the community as helpers or innocent bystanders are injured or killed in the violence a batterer uses to maintain control over the victim. Given the lethal nature of domestic violence as well as its tendency to affect all within its range, the community has a vested interest in the methods used to stop and prevent future violence. Interventions for domestic violence must be based on a complete understanding of the most effective strategies for this specific problem and should be implemented by those well educated and skilled in those methodologies.

Group education programming is recognized as only one of the contributions to effective intervention with those who batter. Other effective intervention strategies include safety for the victims, prompt response by law enforcement, rigorous prosecution, appropriate adjudication, close monitoring by probation, and sentences which reflect the seriousness of this crime against the community. Since education is one approach being used for a problem that has such serious consequences to others, the providers of batterers education programs should meet the highest standards. These standards are necessary to recognize that domestic violence is a serious, potentially lethal problem and that programming for these violent individuals requires more than just a general knowledge of the treatment of behavioral or interpersonal problems. However, education programs must never be used as an alternative to legal sanctions, but always as an adjunct to those sanctions. Research suggests a combination of legal sanctions and education programs are a more effective means of reducing abusive behavior than either one alone. REV: 5/4/94